Design Awards 2014

Our 2014 Design Awards acknowledged design excellence and creativity in projects that help people think bigger, live better, collaborate more, innovate further, or engage the world around them

 

The Design Awards is a biennial event for Santa Clara Valley architects who submit built and unbuilt projects for consideration. Categories for consideration include Architecture, Interior Architecture, Urban Design, Unbuilt, Small Projects, and Emerging Professionals. Projects are judged based on a variety of features, including unique design, originality, extended use attributes, sustainability, budget, and use of environmental surroundings.



HONOR

Category | Architecture

 
  2995 Middlefield | Palo Alto, CA
Architect: Hayes Group Architects
Photographer: Patrik Argast 

About the Project: The goals for the new building were to provide welcoming neighborhood retail, to reinforce the mid-town commercial district, and to incorporate sustainable building features and materials to respond to site forces and environmental factors.

 

The feature two-story glass facade facing Middlefield Road gives the building a presence on the street where a forecourt provides space for gathering. Deep overhangs and sun-shading devices reduce solar gain and encourage an indoor-outdoor use of the building. A pitched roof creates a tall north-facing window that allows natural light to suffuse a second floor office space. The project is targeted for an LEED-CS Silver rating.

  Workday Student Center | Danville, CA
Architect: Steinberg
Photographer: Cesar Rubio
About the Project: Following a generous donation, the vision was to combine library functions into a student-centered commons where collaborative learning and interaction became the focus. The design incorporates a "crossroads" theme, reflecting the junction where libraries stand today -- analog vs. digital, books vs. computers. This theme finds expression in building massing, functional organization, and material palettes. Pixilation of fitted QR codes in glass and sun screens highlight transparency and complexity linear paneling and solidity recall traditional materials.
  801 Alma | Palo Alto, CA
Architect: Rob Wellington Quigley, FAIA
Photographer: Jeff Peters 
About the Project: The Family Housing design explores several methods to mitigate the noise and visual impacts from the adjacent four-lane thoroughfare and the commuter railroad tracks across the street. The concept is to cover a shingle-clad building with a stucco “shawl” that protects the private garden and light courts between the stacked two- and three-bedroom affordable units. Like fingers extending from the corridors, these garden courts filled with bamboo create visual privacy between units and provide natural day-lighting to the double-loaded corridors.


HONOR

Category | Interior Architecture

 
  LPA San Jose Office | San Jose, CA
Architect: LPA, Inc.
Photographer: Christian Costea
About the Project: Located on the ground floor of a 15-story building and completed on a modest Tenant Improvement budget, this LEED Gold interior advances in physical form the company’s collaborative design process and demonstrates the synergies between sustainability and design excellence. Taking advantage of the 18-foot high volume, the space is organized into two zones: a work zone formed by a “ventilated fold” in section that integrates sustainable building systems and a collaboration zone with moveable furniture. Sustainable features are fully exposed and on display inside the space and outside via the storefront for visitors and users.

 

 

MERIT

Category | Architecture

 
  Bascom Library and Community Center | San Jose, CA
Architect: Rob Wellington Quigley, FAIA
Photographer: City of San José
About the Project: Small towns have their square and dense cities have their central plazas, but suburban communities rarely provide that sort of public social space. This project explores the concept of suburban civic space by creating a flexible, multi-purpose outdoor courtyard in the form of a spacious, covered front porch. This space mediates between the six-lane street and parking lot and the more intimate and pedestrian-scaled library and community center.
  Desbard Residence | Palo Alto, CA
Architect: Bellomo Architects
Photographer: Drew Kelly
About the Project: A modern single-family house is located in the northern downtown neighborhood of Palo Alto, a vibrant area surrounded by single-family homes. It was designed with an innovative, modular structural system and sustainable design principles. This residential building not only performs its basic tasks in terms of functional performance, physical comfort, and aesthetic values but it also acts as a mental mediation between space and our mind. The perception of the space created is not a sum of the visual, tactile, and audible elements but in unique way speaks to all your senses at once, creating experience of completeness.
  Volkswagen Automotive Innovation Lab | Stanford, CA
Architect: Cody Anderson Wasney Architects
Photographer: Achille Bigliardi 
About the Project: VAIL gathers under one generous roof all of the programs on campus that design and build cutting edge automobiles. Previously, these programs were scattered about campus, with little opportunity to “talk shop.” To house these culturally diverse programs, the facility is at once a classroom, a computer lab, a machine shop, but above all, a collaborative working and learning environment. Located west of the core campus in an oak-studded landscape that retains much of the character of the founder’s farm, the project is free from the strong campus design aesthetic, and seeks rather to harmonize with its agrarian setting and neighboring structures of utility.

MERIT

Category | Interior Architecture

 
  LinkedIn | Sunnyvale, CA
Architect: Reel Grobman
Photographer: John Sutton
About the Project: This 125,000 SF project consisted of five floors that included collaborative work environments, open offices, café on the first floor, and a full service cafeteria on the fifth floor. The space was a warm shell and designated to meet LEED Gold level certification under Building & Construction. LinkedIn wanted each floor to have its own identity while also maintaining a unified look and feel. We collaborated with employees and department leads to accomplish this with design development, furniture, and finishes.


MERIT

Category | Urban Design

 
  Alma Green | Palo Alto, CA
Architects: Barton Architect and
Carrasco & Associates
About the Project: Several years ago the authors of this study undertook an examination of the possibilities and limitations of high-speed rail in Palo Alto. That former study looked carefully at the costs of undergrounding the train. This study, starting from that point, is intended to spark a dialogue with the community about the possibilities of a dynamic and community-oriented 4-mile long linear park. The proposal, developed as community service in our spare time, is not intended as a definitive plan but rather a set of ideas about what could happen –and how a research and evidence based approach might help.

CITATION

Category | Architecture

 
  d.school: Rehabilitation of Peterson Building
Architect: Cody Anderson Wasney Architects
Photographer: Achille Bigliardi
About the Project: The client had a clear and audacious goal for this adaptive reuse project: create a suitable home for world-class collaborative design institute and engineering center in one of the oldest and most historic buildings in the heart of the campus. The design team met this challenge by stripping away multiple layers of ill conceived “improvements” inflicted upon the building over time, and inserting a modern, day lit atrium that helps recapture the original spatial and natural light qualities of this Richardsonian Romanesque structure. The renovation encompassed design studios, prototyping labs, shops, faculty offices with collaborative niches directly outside their doors, and interaction zones.
  Zurb, Inc. | Campbell, CA
Architect: Modulus
Photographer: Patrik Argast
About the Project: As a business anchored in a small community, the owner of this web agency recognized the need to grow but was reluctant to move to a larger town and abandon home. The local building chosen instead left much to be desired. With no ability to add square footage and a tight budget, the design challenge was to alter the multi-tenant, flat faced, lifeless building into an environment that created both image and impact for the company to expand its horizons and build on its success. The changes were bold, impactful, and tied closely to the company’s philosophy.
  The EcoCenter | Palo Alto, CA
Architect: Cody Anderson Wasney Architects
Photographer: Bruce Damonte
About the Project: In this transformation from historic Sea Scout Base to contemporary environmental education center, a whimsical building designed by a local master was literally pulled from the bay mud and given a new use appropriate to its location in a tidal marsh. This adaptive reuse tackled many daunting technical challenges, restoration of historic fabric, and the deft insertion of new program with ship-like efficiency, resulting in a new educational resource for volunteer teachers, elementary school students, and the many hikers who happen upon it while enjoying the Bay Trail.

 

 

CITATION

Category | Interior Architecture

 
  Shelby Lane | Los Altos, CA
Design Team: MAN Architecture
and Blue Truck Studio
Photographer: G. Todd Roberts
About the Project: To fuse an increasingly digital lifestyle with the ever changing demands of a growing family, MAN Architecture and the Blue Truck Studio re-interpreted and transformed an outdated suburban house typology and created a source of inspiration for modern living. Paradoxically ambitious and modest in its aspirations, the interior architecture project was an exercise in reorganizing the cumbersome existing spaces to be more useful, more integrated, and more adaptable. The interior of this 1975 two-story Colonial became a laboratory for the potential of architecture to be playful, nuanced, and present in the human experience.
  Northside Branch Library | Santa Clara, CA
Architect: Steinberg
Photographer: Tim Griffith

About the Project: Located in the heart of the Rivermark community, the building sits on the southwestern tip of Live Oak Park, in the center of community activity. Situated across from a busy commercial area, it will become the community’s premier civic institution, with opportunities for lifelong learning and state-of-the art resources connecting to global knowledge. Rivermark is multilingual, multi-ethnic, young and vibrant, and this project reflects the community’s sense of energy and optimism.



Outstanding Achievement in Sustainability

 
  Salinas Gateway Senior Apartments | Salinas, CA
Architect: OJK Architects
Photographer: Bernard André

About the Project: Located in the most walkable part of historic downtown Salinas, this innovative mixed use senior housing development provides fifty-two affordable apartments above a commercial retail space at the street level. LEED Platinum amenities offer an abundance of green and sustainable living features adding to an enhanced quality of life for the residents, most of whom have special needs.Drawing upon the region’s agrarian vernacular of packing sheds, cold storages and processing plants, the building’s materials and massing combine to express the Salinas ethos.

 

The four story building provides dignified affordable housing in the form of 52 senior apartments above a ground level parking podium and commercial retail space. The 159,000 sq ft building sits on a small urban infill site of 0.75 acres and includes a community room with computers, a lounge, two community patios and private balconies for each unit.

 

Because 50% of the senior tenants have special needs, the architectural design is simple, intuitive and flexible; accommodating people with a range of abilities (known as Universal Design). Additionally, the location is walkable, bike-able and is well connected to public transportation. Each tenant receives a free transit pass to encourage use of alternative transportation which is especially important for the community.


Environmentally preferable products are integrated throughout the project, including locally sourced materials, materials high in recycled content, non-toxic paints, coatings and materials free of VOCs. The well insulated building envelope includes energy-efficient windows and solar shading to reduce unwanted solar heat gain. Further energy savings are achieved through high-efficiency lighting, water heaters and Energy Star appliances.During construction, 65% of the construction waste was diverted from the landfill.

 

Additionally, the waste was reduced by implementing framing-efficiencies. The property’s maintenance team has been trained in the sustainable operation of the building and each household received a green building orientation tour and educational handbook prior to moving in.Two most outstanding features of the building are its green vegetated roof and its rainwater collection system. Rainwater is first collected from over 12,000 sq ft area of roof and delivered through roof drains to a settling tank, filtration media & cisterns. Over 62 thousand gallons are collected annually.A filtration tank first receives water before pumping to five cisterns that collectively hold 21 thousand gallons of water at a time. Water is then pumped through the irrigation system for site landscaping and the living roof.

 


 

 

 

People’s Choice Award

 
  West Valley College Campus Center | Saratoga, CA
Architect: IBI Group Architecture Planning
Photographer: Marco Zecchin 

New for 2014, the Santa Clara Valley chapter offered the general public a chance to participate in a separate online voting process to determine the winner of our People’s Choice Award from the field of distinguished entrants.


About the Project: The Campus Center and Viking Grove modernization project has become the heart of West Valley College. With the reuse of existing structure, walls, and roof helping to maintain a tight budget, we created a home-away-from-home that would inspire students, staff, the community, and future generations to come. We identified elements that attract students, capture the culture of the campus, and instill a sense of identity and pride, inspiring community members to return to the Center throughout their lives for special events, festivals, exhibitions, and weddings.